Virtual Realities: Immersive Documentary Encounters // Project News // Aug 14, 2018.

DIS18 papers about VR

Your Place and Mine: Designing a Shared VR Experience for Remotely Located Users

Misha Sra (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA) Aske Mottelson (University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark) Pattie Maes (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA)

Virtual reality can help realize mediated social experiences where distance disappears and we interact as richly with those around the world as we do with those in the same room. The design of social virtual experiences presents a challenge for remotely located users with room-scale setups like those afforded by recent commodity virtual reality devices. Since users inhabit different physical spaces that may not be the same size, a mapping to a shared virtual space is needed for creating experiences that allow everyone to use real walking for locomotion. We designed three mapping techniques that enable users from diverse room-scale setups to interact together in virtual reality. Results from our user study (N = 26) show that our mapping techniques positively influence the perceived degree of togetherness and copresence while the size of each user's tracked space influences individual presence.

Misha Sra, Aske Mottelson, and Pattie Maes. 2018. Your Place and Mine: Designing a Shared VR Experience for Remotely Located Users. In Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 85-97. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3196709.3196788

Viking VR: Designing a Virtual Reality Experience for a Museum

Guy Schofield (University of York, York, United Kingdom) Gareth Beale (University of York, York, United Kingdom) Nicole Beale (University of York, York, United Kingdom) Martin Fell (Yorkshire Museums Trust, York, United Kingdom) Dawn Hadley (University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom) Jonathan Hook (University of York, York, United Kingdom) Damian Murphy (University of York, York, United Kingdom) Julian Richards (University of York, York, United Kingdom) Lewis Thresh (University of York, York, United Kingdom)

Viking VR is a Virtual Reality exhibit through which viewers can experience the sights and sounds of a 9th Century Viking encampment. Created as part of a major museum exhibition, the experience was developed by an interdisciplinary team consisting of artists, archaeologists, curators and researchers. In this paper, approaches to the design of authentic, informative and compelling VR experiences for Cultural Heritage contexts are discussed. We also explore issues surrounding interaction design for the long-term deployment of VR experiences in museums and discuss the challenges of VR authoring workflows for interdisciplinary teams.

Guy Schofield, Gareth Beale, Nicole Beale, Martin Fell, Dawn Hadley, Jonathan Hook, Damian Murphy, Julian Richards, and Lewis Thresh. 2018. Viking VR: Designing a Virtual Reality Experience for a Museum. In Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 805-815. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3196709.3196714

VMotion: Designing a Seamless Walking Experience in VR

Misha Sra (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA) Xuhai Xu (Tsinghua University, Beijing, China) Aske Mottelson (University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark) Pattie Maes (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA)

Physically walking in virtual reality can provide a satisfying sense of presence. However, natural locomotion in virtual worlds larger than the tracked space remains a practical challenge. Numerous redirected walking techniques have been proposed to overcome space limitations but they often require rapid head rotation, sometimes induced by distractors, to keep the scene rotation imperceptible. We propose a design methodology of seamlessly integrating redirection into the virtual experience that takes advantage of the perceptual phenomenon of inattentional blindness. Additionally, we present four novel visibility control techniques that work with our design methodology to minimize disruption to the user experience commonly found in existing redirection techniques. A user study (N = 16) shows that our techniques are imperceptible and users report significantly less dizziness when using our methods. The illusion of unconstrained walking in a large area (16 x 8m) is maintained even though users are limited to a smaller (3.5 x 3.5m) physical space.

Misha Sra, Xuhai Xu, Aske Mottelson, and Pattie Maes. 2018. VMotion: Designing a Seamless Walking Experience in VR. In Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 59-70. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3196709.3196792

Immersive Design Fiction: Using VR to Prototype Speculative Interfaces and Interaction Rituals within a Virtual Storyworld

Joshua McVeigh-Schultz (University of Southern California & University of California Santa Cruz, Los Angeles, CA, USA) Max Kreminski (University of California Santa Cruz & University of Southern California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA) Keshav Prasad (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA) Perry Hoberman (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA) Scott S. Fisher (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA)

Immersive design fiction is a novel approach that embeds speculative interactions within a rich virtual reality (VR) storyworld. Immersive design fictions use VR to translate new design opportunities into story-driven, embodied experiences by positioning the participant as a character in a narrative world. This paper presents a case study of an immersive design fiction that depicts a fictionalized reimagining of an industry partner's work practices. This VR experience explores speculative interfaces for creative work and collaboration in the context of a fictional workplace environment. By placing design fictions within rich immersive contexts such as room-scale VR, researchers and practitioners can go beyond prototyping imagined interfaces to also speculate about the interaction rituals and surrounding social context within an experiential storyworld. This approach makes methodological and theoretical contributions to design fiction research by demonstrating a toolkit for exploring and reflecting upon the intersections between speculation, embodiment, and narrative context.

Joshua McVeigh-Schultz, Max Kreminski, Keshav Prasad, Perry Hoberman, and Scott S. Fisher. 2018. Immersive Design Fiction: Using VR to Prototype Speculative Interfaces and Interaction Rituals within a Virtual Storyworld. In Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 817-829. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3196709.3196793

VRSpinning: Exploring the Design Space of a 1D Rotation Platform to Increase the Perception of Self-Motion in VR

Michael Rietzler (Ulm University, Ulm, Germany) Teresa Hirzle (Ulm University, Ulm, Germany) Jan Gugenheimer (Ulm University, Ulm, Germany) Julian Frommel (Ulm University, Ulm, Germany) Thomas Dreja (Ulm University, Ulm, Germany) Enrico Rukzio (Ulm University, Ulm, Germany)

Current approaches for locomotion in virtual reality are either creating a visual-vestibular conflict, which is assumed to cause simulator sickness, or use metaphors such as teleportation to travel longer distances, lacking the perception of self motion. We propose VRSpinning, a seated locomotion approach based around stimulating the user's vestibular system using a rotational impulse to induce the perception of linear self-motion. In a first study we explored the approach of oscillating the chair in different frequencies during visual forward motion and collected user preferences on applying these feedback types. In a second user study we used short bursts of rotational acceleration to match the visual forward acceleration. We found that this rotational stimulus significantly reduced simulator sickness and increased the perception of self-motion in comparison to no physical motion.

Michael Rietzler, Teresa Hirzle, Jan Gugenheimer, Julian Frommel, Thomas Dreja, and Enrico Rukzio. 2018. VRSpinning: Exploring the Design Space of a 1D Rotation Platform to Increase the Perception of Self-Motion in VR. In Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference(DIS '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 99-108. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3196709.3196755

Interactive and Situated Guidelines to Help Users Design a Personal Desk that Fits Their Bodies

Bokyung Lee (Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Rebublic of Korea) Joongi Shin (Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Rebublic of Korea) Hyoshin Bae (Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Rebublic of Korea) Daniel Saakes (Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Rebublic of Korea)

In this paper, we explored the application of human factor guidelines in personal fabrication. This is useful for several Do-It-Yourself (DIY) scenarios, including users adjusting workstation configurations or designing a desk to fit a single person. We identified a dependency map between the user's anthropometrics, ergonomic pose recommendations, and design dimensions. Based on this, we developed situated and interactive guidelines to assist users in design applications. We applied these guidelines in a Virtual Reality (VR) system that lets users customize their desk and provides real-time feedback and feedforward on pose and design. We evaluated the system with six participants, had each one design a personal desk, fabricated their desks, and let them work on their desks for four hours. The design and evaluation contribute to fabrication tools as it helped users be aware of their pose and ergonomic knowledge, and design for their bodies and needs.

Bokyung Lee, Joongi Shin, Hyoshin Bae, and Daniel Saakes. 2018. Interactive and Situated Guidelines to Help Users Design a Personal Desk that Fits Their Bodies. In Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 637-650. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3196709.3196725

Attending to Breath: Exploring How the Cues in a Virtual Environment Guide the Attention to Breath and Shape the Quality of Experience to Support Mindfulness

Mirjana Prpa (Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC, Canada) Kıvanç Tatar (Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada) Jules Françoise (Universite Paris-Sud, Universite Paris-Saclay, Paris, France) Bernhard Riecke (Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC, Canada) Thecla Schiphorst (Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada) Philippe Pasquier (Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada)

Busy daily lives and ongoing distractions often make people feel disconnected from their bodies and experiences. Guided attention to self can alleviate this disconnect as in focused-attention meditation, in which breathing often constitutes the primary object on which to focus attention. In this context, sustained breath awareness plays a crucial role in the emergence of the meditation experience. We designed an immersive virtual environment (iVE) with a generative soundtrack that supports sustained attention on breathing by employing the users' breathing in interaction. Both sounds and visuals are directly mapped to the user's breathing patterns, thus bringing the awareness researched. We conducted micro-phenomenology interviews to unfold the process in which breath awareness can be induced and sustained in this environment. The findings revealed the mechanisms by which audio and visual cues in VR can elicit and foster breath-awareness, and unfolded the nuances of this process through subjective experiences of the study participants. Finally, the results emphasize the important role that a sense of agency and control have in shaping the overall quality of the experience. This can in turn inform the design specifications of future mindfulness-based designs focused on breath awareness.

Mirjana Prpa, Kıvanç Tatar, Jules Françoise, Bernhard Riecke, Thecla Schiphorst, and Philippe Pasquier. 2018. Attending to Breath: Exploring How the Cues in a Virtual Environment Guide the Attention to Breath and Shape the Quality of Experience to Support Mindfulness. In Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference (DIS '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 71-84. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3196709.3196765